For the past 20-30 years, every major animal welfare organization , animal behaviorist,  and trainer has
come out publicly with official position statements regarding the use
of breed specific ordinances and law to enforce and ensure public safety.
Listed below are just a few of those statements and their sources:
Those In The Know
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Those In The Know
Dangerous Dogs and Breed-Specific Legislation
The Humane Society of the United States

The Humane Society of the United States offers the following position regarding breed-specific policies:

The HSUS opposes legislation aimed at eradicating or strictly regulating dogs based solely on their breed for a number of reasons. Breed Specific
Legislation (BSL) is a common first approach that many communities take. Thankfully, once research is conducted most community leaders correctly
realize that BSL won't solve the problems they face with dangerous dogs.

Source-
http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/dogs/facts/statement_dangerous_dogs_breed_specific_legislation.html
American Humane believes that no breed of dog automatically poses a high risk of attack, and that it is unjust to punish loving, responsible dog
owners merely because of a breed’s reputation. American Humane supports efforts to protect members of the community from dangerous animals and
encourages communities to hold pet owners responsible for any injury caused
by animals in their care. American Humane also encourages dog owners to undergo basic obedience training with their pets and to
socialize them with people and other animals from an early age.

Source-
http://www.americanhumane.org/assets/pdfs/animals/au-animal-welfare-position-statements.pdf
Despite the well-established strength of the human-animal bond (Wensley, 2008), with nearly 74 million dogs living as companion animals in the
United States, coexistence is not always peaceful. Approximately 334,000 people a year seek medical treatment for dog bites in emergency rooms
(Bradley, 2006), with an additional unknown number of individuals incurring other dog bite-related injuries (e.g. breaking a bone while fleeing a
threatening dog) (AVMA, 2001). Notwithstanding relative stability in the number of dog bites over time (Bradley, 2006), and the fact that according to
the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) only two percent of those seeking... (read more)

Source-
http://www.aspca.org/about-us/policy-positions/breed-specific-legislation-1.aspx
The American Kennel Club strongly supports reasonable, enforceable dangerous dog laws designed to keep communities safe for both people and
dogs. We believe that dog owners should be responsible for their dogs and that laws should impose appropriate penalties on irresponsible owners. In
order to be effective, however, such legislation should judge a dog based on its deed rather than its breed.

Source-
http://www.akc.org/news/index.cfm?article_id=1974
Many cities and even other countries have lifted BSL as it has had no impact on dog bites and attacks. BSL just doesn’t work—it’s a result of media
hysteria, it’s difficult to enforce, and will not significantly reduce bites. It will also come at great cost to communities that attempt it. More law
enforcement hours will be needed to enforce the law, and worse, more dogs will end up burdening shelters. Only responsible owners will be affected, no
let me rephrase that, PUNISHED by these laws, and little impact will be had on those already irresponsible owners or those using dogs for illegal or
immoral purposes. These ‘bad’ owners may simply dump dogs and move on to another breed once their breed is banned or restricted. Instead of BSL,
communities should more aggressively enforce laws that emphasize owner responsibility, such as leash laws, dog fighting, and animal cruelty statutes.
Furthermore, a well-written dangerous dog statute that defines dangerous and vicious dogs by acts and conduct would be much more effective in
realistically reducing dog bites and attacks all across the board, rather than just impacting certain breeds. Bill Bruce and his Animal Bylaw Services in
Calgary have achieved a safer community through enforcement of common sense dog laws (no BSL) and owner education; simply enforcing their
licensing laws was one of the factors that got the ball rolling. Calgary has a 90% dog license compliance rate! The key is owner responsibility for all dog
owners, which will better protect the community from dog bites and attacks.

Source-
http://www.ukcdogs.com/WebSite.nsf/e63329fac2fcceaa8525735c0061eb4d/531c5afbe80f4ca285257863006d3045?OpenDocument&Highlight=0,
Breed,Specific,Legislation
The AVMA's dog bite prevention campaign continues to inform the public about techniques for avoiding dog bites, and to promote responsible pet
ownership. Breeds don't need to be banned, but dog owners' irresponsible behavior should be.

Source- http://
www.avma.org/onlnews/javma/nov00/s111500c.asp
“If the goal is dog–bite prevention, then dogs should be treated as individuals under effective dangerous dog laws and not as part of a breed painted
with certain traits that may not be applicable to each dog. By doing so, owners of well–trained, gentle dogs are not punished by a breed ban, while
dangerous dogs of all breeds are regulated and may have their day in court to be proven dangerous.”

Source-
http://www.aldf.org/article.php?id=1029
We believe that breed specific legislation is flawed and suggests that all dogs of a certain type are dangerous while others are not. In reality any dog
regardless of breed has the ability to use aggression, but it is always dependent upon what they believe is happening to them.

Source-
http://www.rspca.org.uk/getinvolved/campaigns/rehomeadog/staffyfacts/details/-/article/CAM_Question8
Best Friends attorneys draft ordinances and laws that truly protect communities from reckless owners and dangerous dogs. We lobby for passage of
good legislation and help stop ineffective or discriminatory legislation. Best Friends opposes breed-discriminatory legislation (also called breed-specific
legislation, BSL), which arbitrarily targets particular breeds. Breed-discriminatory laws are not only ineffective at improving community safety, they are
extremely expensive to enforce and deplete needed resources from animal control.

Source-
http://www.bestfriends.org/nomorehomelesspets/pit_bulls.cfm
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"Serious dog bites tend to receive a disproportionate amount of news coverage, but in fact they are relatively rare. The implications are
many, but center on so-called dangerous dog ordinances as well as Breed-Specific Legislation (BSL). This study shows that no breed is
more likely to bite than other breeds; given that dog bites are an important measure of aggression, this further suggests that BSL is
unjustified."

http://www.animalsandsociety.org/blog/dog-bites-states-and-solutions
"Although fatal attacks on humans appear to be a breed-specific problem (pit bull-type dogs and Rottweilers), other
breeds may bite and cause fatalities at higher rates. Because of difficulties inherent in determining a dog’s breed with
certainty, enforcement of breed-specific ordinances raises constitutional and practical issues. Fatal attacks represent
a small proportion of dog bite injuries to humans and, therefore, should not be the primary factor driving public policy
concerning dangerous dogs. Many practical alternatives to breed-specific ordinances exist and hold promise for
prevention of dog bites. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:836–840)"

http://www.dogexpert.com/FatalDogAttack/Other%20sources%20of%20info/Breeds%20of%20dog%20involved%20in%20fatal%20attacks.pdf
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